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The Food Fix
Welcome to The Food Fix, where we talk with innovators figuring out how to better feed the world.
Category: Fitness & Nutrition
Location: East Lansing, Michigan
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The Food Fix is produced by students and faculty at the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation at Michigan State University....


by The Food Fix
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September 11, 2017 01:10 PM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism’s two-continent, three-country training tour, we’re sharing stories that we’ve received through our global partnerships.

This story on the communicating research to the public was produced by Bernadetta Chiwanda from FM 101 Power Radio.

Chiwanda interviewed Dave Poulson, the Senior Director of The Knight Center.

Poulson says research is no good if no one knows about it.

FM 101 Power Radio is Malawi’s first independent radio station and covers all three regions of the country.

For more information on The Knight Center’s tour and partnerships, read more here: https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

September 07, 2017 09:56 AM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism's two-continent, three-country training tour, we're sharing stories that we've received through our global partnerships.

This story on the relationship between Malawi's researchers and farmers was produced by Bernadetta Chiwanda from FM 101 Power Radio.

Emmanuel Kaunda is the out-going Acting Vice Chancellor at Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Fisheries.

He says poor communication between scientists and farmers cost Malawi billions of Kwachas, Malawi's currency.

FM 101 Power Radio is Malawi's first independent radio station and covers all three regions of the country.

For more information on The Knight Center's tour and partnerships, read more here:

https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

August 31, 2017 10:30 AM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism's two-continent, three-country training tour, we're sharing stories that we've received through our global partnerships.

Stanley Kadzuwa from The Malawi Institute of Journalism (MIJ) FM Radio interviewed David Poulson, Senior Associate Director of The Knight Center and Professor of Journalism at Michigan State University.

Poulson talked about communicating research through journalism, the differences between Malawi and Michigan, and some stories from the training tour.

MIJ FM Radio has operated for over 15 years and airs programs throughout Malawi's three regions.

For more information on The Knight Center's tour and partnerships, read more here:

https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

August 23, 2017 11:06 AM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism's two-continent, three-country training tour, we're sharing stories that we've received through our global partnerships.

This story on publishing research from Malawian scientists was produced by Rhoda Msiska from the Voice of Livingstonia.

Scientists in Malawi are coordinating with the media to spread the word of their research.

Some say research findings haven't been put to full use due to poor communication.

Voice of Livingstonia is a radio station operated in the Northern Region of Malawi, and reaches over 4 million listeners.

For more information on The Knight Center's tour and partnerships, check out our Wordpress:

https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

August 22, 2017 09:28 AM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism's two-continent, three-country training tour, we're sharing stories that we've received through our global partnerships.

This story on increasing the population of goats in Malawi was produced by Rhoda Msiska from the Voice of Livingstonia.

Researchers in Malawi are trying to make healthier goats.

Innovations in goat productivity could potentially boost goat populations from 8 million to 50 million in Malawi alone.

Voice of Livingstonia is a radio station operated in the Northern Region of Malawi, and reaches over 4 million listeners.

For more information on The Knight Center's tour and partnerships, check out our Wordpress:

https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

August 21, 2017 09:45 AM PDT

As part of The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism's two-continent, three-country training tour, we're sharing stories that we've received through our global partnerships.

This story on biodiversity in Malawian crops was produced by Rhoda Msiska from the Voice of Livingstonia.

Malawi is producing more cassava and sweet potato, which could boost dietary diversity in households.

In order to do that researchers are looking into making those crops more resilient to pests and crop failure.

Voice of Livingstonia is a radio station operated in the Northern Region of Malawi, and reaches over 4 million listeners.

For more information on The Knight Center's tour and partnerships, check out our Wordpress:

https://msufoodfix.wordpress.com/2017/08/20/bridging-food-scientists-and-journalists-with-communications-training/#more-1596

July 27, 2017 12:12 PM PDT

Today’s idea to make the world less hungry is to regulate and standardize the date labels on our food.

If you wander through your local grocery store, you’re likely to see a lot of labels with dates preceded by a warning.

“Best if used by,” this date, “sell by,” that date, “use by”...this date.

These labels can have different meanings, some are for freshness, others are for quality, but all these labels have one thing in common: they’re confusing.

The nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) estimates that 20 percent of food waste that occurs at home, stems from confusion over what these labels mean.

In other words, people are throwing away good food, because they think that if it’s past the “best if used by” date, it’s spoiled. That isn’t the case.

In this episode, you’ll hear why these labels cause food waste, and of legislation to simplify food labels.

July 11, 2017 05:51 AM PDT

Food finances are tricky. For example, funding food production in developing countries has been difficult for a number of reasons, according to Rebecca Toole, a policy expert in economics.

“Farmers may seem like risky borrowers,” Toole said. “They often don’t have a established credit history, they also might not have stores of capital they could use as collateral for loans.”

Heifer International, a global non-profit, has been using a method called ‘Impact Investing.’ That’s where you have the private sector invest in food production, with a smaller relative return to their investment.

Bill Foreman, spokesman for Heifer International, says the return can then be used for another investment.

“The idea is that you invest capital and you don’t really expect to get the same kind of return,” So we expect to get some capital back and then we use it for another project.”

In this episode of our ongoing series, "10 ideas to make the world less hungry,” we tackle the complicated issue of financing food, and the ideas that are making it possible.

July 05, 2017 06:13 AM PDT

There is a form of hunger afflicting people worldwide that you can’t see.

That’s called ‘hidden hunger’––when people may be eating regularly, but still suffer from deficiencies or malnutrition.

Hugo Campos is the director of research at the International Potato Center in Lima, Peru. He says that a process called biofortification may help.

That's when plant breeders grow crops with additional nutrition and vitamins. Biofortified crops are an effective way to tackle hiding hunger, Campos said.

“Someone might have a normal appearance, but [they] might have anemia issues, or [they] might not be receiving the right amount of content that’s really important for his or her health,” he said.

Biofortification has broad benefits.

“You develop varieties which are not only producing value for the farmer,” Campos says. “They produce value for the consumers.”

In this episode of our ongoing series, "10 ideas to make the world less hungry: Campos talks about the role biofortification plays in feeding the world.

Listen above.

June 19, 2017 09:25 AM PDT

There’s an application for buying, selling, dating, driving. How about one for saving food?

Olio is a free app on iPhone and Android that helps people share food. Co-founder Saasha Celestial-One wants Olio to lead the ‘Food Sharing Revolution.’

“We just want to seamlessly connect people everywhere to be able to share things, and that sharing becomes the new normal,” Celestial-One said.

Learn how the app works its inspiration and how the creators are cutting down on household food waste in this Food Fix interview with Celestia-One.

And check back Monday for a new idea in our series on how to make the world less hungry.

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